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For a while, I have been getting frustrated by the hypocrisy that surrounds many peoples’ belief systems.

If you are Christian or Jewish we (in the US) cannot mock you. This constitutes the normal belief system. Up until 9/11, Muslims were pretty much ignored (ie: not mocked nearly as strongly or as frequently, viewed as more “normal”). Now they are less mocked as they are hated (a completely different topic). You don’t mock a persons’ beliefs. That’s not right. If I believe in God then most people will not say anything negative. Most people don’t mock others for believing in God. This is normal. But what about Hinduism? “Oh, we can laugh at them because they believe in lots of gods. How uneducated.” Buddhism is a “weird” and often “hippy” religion, and don’t get people started on the lesser known ones like Paganism and Wicca.

Let’s get one thing straight. Religion involves belief. Faith. No one (okay, very few people) will come up to you and say I have proof that [a] god exists the same way that I can prove that my hand exists (let’s not get too philosophical about the hand thing). Religious beliefs are just that: beliefs. There is no proof. Your belief in one god is no more ridiculous than someone else’s belief in multiple gods. And your belief that god allows us to eat all animals is just as valid as another person’s belief that god wants us to be vegetarian. These are all beliefs.

In the US, the wide-held cultural goal is to promote education and political correctness. No racial slurs, no making fun of others beliefs…unless they are stupid beliefs. What makes something a stupid belief? Believing in ghosts, psychics, astrology? What of those are any more stupid than believing in one god who created the world? And if you’re an atheist that doesn’t make you any better. You have no proof that there isn’t a god any more than those who believe they have proof that there is. You have no right to mock others for their beliefs and think yourself any better. Maybe you’re “a scientist”. What does that mean? You believe in gravity? What is gravity? Show it to me. An invisible force that causes things to happen. Sounds a bit like a god to me.

Okay, so that’s a little ranty, but my point still stands. We, no matter what we belief, have no right to judge, mock, or try to change the beliefs of others unless they infringe on our own life. And no, that Sikh man wearing a turban or that Muslim woman wearing a hijjab does not infringe on your life just because you have to look at them and know their beliefs don’t align with yours.

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